Predicting the World Champion

A couple of years ago I built a model to evaluate how Froome and Dumoulin would have matched up, if they had not avoided racing against each other over the 2017 season. As we approach the 2019 World Championships Road Race in Yorkshire, I have adopted a more sophisticated approach to try to predict the winner of the men’s race. The smart money could be going on Sam Bennett.

Deep learning

With only two races outstanding, most of this year’s UCI world tour results are available. I decided to broaden the data set with 2.HC classification European Tour races, such as the OVO Energy Tour of Britain. In order to help with prediction, I included each rider’s weight and height, as well as some meta-data about each race, such as date, distance, average speed, parcours and type (stage, one-day, GC, etc.).

The key question was what exactly are you trying to predict? The UCI allocates points for race results, using a non-linear scale. For example, Mathieu Van Der Poel was awarded 500 points for winning Amstel Gold, while Simon Clarke won 400 for coming second and Jakob Fuglsang picked up 325 for third place, continuing down to 3 points for coming 60th. I created a target variable called PosX, defined as a negative exponential of the rider’s position in any race, equating to 1.000 for a win, 0.834 for second, 0.695 for third, decaying down to 0.032 for 20th. This has a similar profile to the points scheme, emphasising the top positions, and handles races with different numbers of riders.

A random forest would be a typical choice of model for this kind of data set, which included a mixture of continuous and categorical variables. However, I opted for a neural network, using embeddings to encode the categorical variables, with two hidden layers of 200 and 100 activations. This was very straightforward using the fast.ai library. Training was completed in a handful of seconds on my MacBook Pro, without needing a GPU.

After some experimentation on a subset of the data, it was clear that the model was coming up with good predictions on the validation set and the out-of-sample test set. With a bit more coding, I set up a procedure to load a start list and the meta-data for a future race, in order to predict the result.

Predictions

With the final start list for the World Championships Road Race looking reasonably complete, I was able to generate the predicted top 10. The parcours obviously has an important bearing on who wins a race. With around 3600m of climbing, the course was clearly hilly, though not mountainous. Although the finish was slightly uphill, it was not ridiculously steep, so I decided to classify the parcours as rolling with a flat finish

PositionRiderPrediction
1Mathieu Van Der Poel0.602
2Alexander Kristoff0.566
3Sam Bennett0.553
4Peter Sagan0.540
5Edvald Boasson Hagen0.507
6Greg Van Avermaet0.500
7Matteo Trentin0.434
8Michael Matthews0.423
9Julian Alaphilippe0.369
10Mike Teunissen0.362

It was encouraging to see that the model produced a highly credible list of potential top 10 riders, agreeing with the bookies in rating Mathieu Van Der Poel as the most likely winner. Sagan was ranked slightly below Kristoff and Bennett, who are seen as outsiders by the pundits. The popular choice of Philippe Gilbert did not appear in my top 10 and Alaphilippe was only 9th, in spite of their recent strong performances in the Vuelta and the Tour, respectively. Riders in positions 5 to 10 would all be expected to perform well in the cycling classics, which tend to be long and arduous, like the Yorkshire course.

For me, 25/1 odds on Sam Bennett are attractive. He has a strong group of teammates, in Dan Martin, Eddie Dunbar, Connor Dunne, Ryan Mullen and Rory Townsend, who will work hard to keep him with the lead group in the hillier early part of the race. Then he will then face an extremely strong Belgian team that is likely to play the same game that Deceuninck-QuickStep successfully pulled off in stage 17 of the Vuelta, won by Gilbert. But Bennett was born in Belgium and he was clearly the best sprinter out in Spain. He should be able to handle the rises near the finish.

A similar case can be made for Kristoff, while Matthews and Van Avermaet both had recent wins in Canada. Nevertheless it is hard to look past the three-times winner Peter Sagan, though if Van Der Poel launches one of his explosive finishes, there is no one to stop him pulling on the rainbow jersey.

Appendix

After the race, I checked the predicted position of the eventual winner, Mads Pedersen. He was expected to come 74th. Clearly the bad weather played a role in the result, favouring the larger riders, who were able to keep warmer. The Dane clearly proved to be the strongest rider on the day.

References

Code used for this project

Cycling Physique

It is easy to assume that successful professional cyclists are all skinny little guys, but if you look at the data, it turns out that they have an average height of 1.80m and an average weight of around 68kg. If we are to believe the figures posted on ProCyclingStats, hardly any professional cyclists would be considered underweight. In fact, they would struggle to perform at the required level if they did not maintain a healthy weight.

Taller than you might think

According to a study published in 2013 and updated in 2019, the global average height of adult males born in 1996 was 1.71m, but there is considerable regional variation. The vast majority of professional cyclists come from Europe, North America, Russia and the Antipodes where men tend to be taller than those from Asia, Africa and South America. For the 41 Colombians averaging 1.73m, there are 85 Dutch riders with a mean height of 1.84m. See chart below.

Furthermore, road cycling involves a range of disciplines, including sprinting and time trialling, where size and raw power provide an advantage. The peloton includes larger sprinters alongside smaller climbers.

Not as light as expected

While 68kg for a 1.80m male is certainly slim, it equates to a body mass index of 21 (BMI = weight / (height)²), which is towards the middle of the recommended healthy range. BMI is not a sophisticated measure, as it does not distinguish between fat and muscle. Since muscle is more dense than fat and cyclists tend to have it a higher percentage of lean body mass, they will look slimmer than a lay person of equivalent height and weight. Nevertheless doctors use BMI as a guide and become concerned when it falls below 18.5.

Smaller Colombians and taller Dutch professional cyclists have similar BMIs

The chart includes over 1,100 professional cyclists, but very few pros would be considered underweight. The majority of riders have a BMI of between 20 and 22. Although Colombian riders (red) tend to be smaller, specialising in climbing, their average BMI of 20.8 is not that different from larger Dutch riders (orange) with a mean BMI of 21.2. The taller Colombians include the sprinters Hodeg, Gaviria and Molano.

Types of rider

Weights and heights of a sample of top professional cyclists

This chart shows the names of a sample of top riders. All-out sprinters tend to have a BMI of around 24, even if they are small like Caleb Ewan. Sprints at the end of more rolling courses are likely to be won by riders with a BMI of 22, such as Greipel, van Avermaet, Sagan, Gaviria, Groenewegen, Bennet and Kwiatkowski. Time trial specialists like Dennis and Thomas have similar physiques, though Dumoulin and Froome are significantly lighter and remarkably similar to each other.

GC contenders Roglic, Kruiswijk and Gorka Izagirre are near the centre of the distribution with a BMI around 21, close to Viviani, who is unusually light for a sprinter. Pinot, Valverde, Dan Martin, the Yates brothers and Pozzovivo appear to be light for their heights. Interestingly climbers such as Quintana, Uran, Alaphilippe, Carapaz and Richie Porte all have a BMI of around 21, whereas Lopez is a bit heavier.

If the figures reported on ProCyclingStats are accurate, George Bennet and Emanuel Buchmann are significantly underweight. Weighting 58kg for a height of 1.80m does not seem to be conducive to strong performance, unless they are extraordinary physical specimens.

Conclusions

Professional cyclists are lean, but they would not be able to achieve the performance required if they were underweight. It is possible that the weights of individual riders might vary over time by a couple of kilos, moving them a small amount vertically on the chart, but scientific approaches are increasingly employed by expert nutritionists to avoid significant weight loss over longer stage races. The Jumbo Foodcoach app was developed alongside the Jumbo-Visma team and, working with Team Sky, James Morton strove to ensure that athletes fuel for the work required. Excessive weight loss can lead to a range of problems for health and performance.

References

Code used for this analysis

Sunflowers

Image in the style of @grandtourart

Last year, I experimented with using style transfer to automatically generate images in the style of @grandtourart. More recently I developed a more ambitious version of my rather simple bike identifier. The connection between these two projects is sunflowers. This blog describes how I built a flower identification app.

In the brilliant fast.ai Practical Deep Learning for Coders course, Jeremy Howard recommends downloading a publicly available dataset to improve one’s image categorisation skills. I decided to experiment with the 102 Category Flower Dataset, kindly made available by the Visual Geometry Group at Oxford University. In the original 2008 paper, the researchers used a combination of techniques to segment each image and characterise its features. Taking these as inputs to a Support Vector Machine classifier, their best model achieved an accuracy of 72.8%.

Annoyingly, I could not find a list linking the category numbers to the names of the flowers, so I scraped the page showing sample images and found the images in the labelled data.

Using exactly the same training, validation and test sets, my ResNet34 model quickly achieved an accuracy of 80.0%. I created a new branch of the GitHub repository established for the Bike Image model and linked this to a new web service on my Render account. The huge outperformance of the paper was satisfying, but I was sure that a better result was possible.

The Oxford researchers had divided their set of 8,189 labelled images into a training set and a validation set, each containing 10 examples of the 102 flowers. The remaining 6,149 images were reserved for testing. Why allocate less that a quarter of the data to training/validation? Perhaps this was due to limits on computational resources available at the time. In fact, the training and validation sets were so small that I was able to train the ResNet34 on my MacBook Pro’s CPU, within an acceptable time.

My plan to improve accuracy was to merge the test set into the training set, keeping aside the original validation set of 1,020 images for testing. This expanded training set of 7,261 images immediately failed on my MacBook, so I uploaded my existing model onto my PaperSpace GPU, with amazing results. Within 45 minutes, I had a model with 97.0% accuracy on the held-out test set. I quickly exported the learner and switched the link in the flowers branch of my GitHub repository. The committed changes automatically fed straight through to the web service on Render.

I discovered, when visiting the app on my phone, that selecting an image offers the option to take a photo and upload it directly for identification. Having exhausted the flowers in my garden, I have risked being spotted by neighbours as I furtively lean over their front walls to photograph the plants in their gardens.

Takeaways

It is very efficient to use smaller datasets and low resolution images for initial training. Save the model and then increase resolution. Often you can do this on a local CPU without even paying for access to a GPU. When you have a half decent model, upload it onto a GPU and continue training with the full dataset. Deploying the model as a web service on Render makes the model available to any device, including a mobile phone.

My final model is amazing… and it works for sunflowers.

References

Automated flower classification over a large number of classes, Maria-Elena Nilsback and Andrew Zisserman, Visual Geometry Group, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, men,az@robots.ox.ac.uk

102 Flowers Jupyter notebook

Bike Identification as a web app

One of the first skills acquired in the latest version of the fast.ai course on deep learning is how to create a production version of an image classifier that runs as a web application. I decided to test this out on a set of images of road bikes, TT bikes and mountain bikes. To try it out, click on the image above or go to this website https://bike-identifier.onrender.com/ and select an image from your device. If you are using a phone, you can try taking photos of different bikes, then click on Analyse to see if they are correctly identified. Side-on images work best.

How does it work?

The first task was to collect some sample images for the three classes of bicycles I had chosen: road, TT and MTB. It turns out that there is a neat way to obtain the list of urls for a Google image search, by running some javascript in the console. I downloaded 200 images for each type of bike and removed any that could not be opened. This relatively small data set allowed me to do all the machine learning using the CPU on my MacBook Pro in less than an hour.

The fast.ai library provides a range of convenient ways to access images for the purpose of training a neural network. In this instance, I used the default option of applying transfer learning to a pre-trained ResNet34 model, scaling the images to 224 pixel squares, with data augmentation. After doing some initial training, it was useful to look at the images that had been misclassified, as many of these were incorrect images of motorbikes or cartoons or bike frames without wheels or TT bars. Taking advantage of a useful fast.ai widget, I removed unhelpful training images and trained the model further.

The confusion matrix showed that final version of my model was running at about 90% accuracy on the validation set, which was hardly world-beating, but not too bad. The main problem was a tendency to mistake certain road bikes for TT bikes. This was understandable, given the tendency for road bikes to become more aero, though it was disappointing when drop handlebars were clearly visible.

The next step was to make my trained network available as a web application. First I exported the models parameter settings to Dropbox. Then I forked a fast.ai repository into my GitHub account and edited the files to link to my Dropbox, switching the documentation appropriately for bicycle identification. In the final step, I set up a free account on Render to host a web service linked to my GitHub repository. This automatically updates for any changes pushed to the repository.

Amazingly, it all works!

References

fast.ai lesson 2

My GitHub repository, include Jupyter notebook

Betting on the Tour

Source: ASO Media

On the eve of the Tour de France, the pundits have made their predictions, but when the race is over, they will be long forgotten. One way of checking your own forecasts is to take a look at the odds offered on the betting markets. These are interesting, because they reflect the actions of people who have actually put money behind their views. In an efficient and liquid market, the latest prices ought to reflect all information available. This blog takes a look at the current odds, without wishing to encourage gambling in any way.

The website oddchecker.com collates the odds from a number of bookmakers across a large range of bets. It is helpful to convert the odds into predicted probabilities. Focussing on the overall winner,  Egan Bernal is the favourite at 5/2 (equating to a 29% probability taking the yellow jersey), followed by Geraint Thomas at 7/2 (22%) and Jakob Fuglsang at 6/1 (14%). This gives a 51% chance of a winner being one of the two Team Ineos riders. The three three leading contenders are some distance ahead of Adam Yates, Richie Porte, Thibaut Pinot and Nairo Quintana. Less fancied riders include Roman Bardet, Steven Kruijswijk, Rigoberto Uran, Mikel Landa, Enric Mas and Vincenzo Nibali. Anyone else is seen as an outsider.

Ups and downs

The odds change over time, as the markets evaluate the performance and changing fortunes of the riders. In the following chart shows the fluctuations in the average daily implied winning chances of the three current favourites since the beginning of the year, according to betfair.com.

The implied probability that Geraint Thomas would repeat last year’s win has hovered between 20% and 30%, spiking up a bit during the Tour of Romandie. Unfortunately, Chris Froome’s odds are no longer available, as he was most likely the favourite earlier this year. However, his crash on 11 June instantaneously improved the odds for other riders, particularly Thomas and Bernal, though expectations for the Welshman declined after he crashed out of the Tour de Suisse on 18 June.

The betting on Fuglsang spiked up sharply during the Tirreno Adriatico, where he won a stage and came 3rd on GC, and the Tour of the Basque country, where he finished strongly. Apparently, his three podium results in the the Ardenne Classics had no effect on his chances of a yellow jersey, whereas his victory in the Critérium Dauphiné had a significant positive impact.

Egan Bernal, appeared from the shadows. At the beginning of the year, he was seen as a third string in Team Ineos. His victory in Paris Nice hardly registered on his odds for the Tour. But since Froome’s crash and Thomas’s departure from the Tour de Suisse, he became the bookies’ favourite.

With 65% of the money on the three main contenders, there are some pretty good odds available on other riders. A couple of crashes, an off day or a bit of bad luck could turn the race on its head. Clearly the Ineos and Astana teams are capable of protecting their GC contenders, but so too are Movistar, EF Education First, Michelton Scott, Groupama-FDJ, Bahrain Merida and others.

References

Code I used can be found here

Poetic interlude

Bojowocky – after Lewis Carroll

’Twas Brexit, and the slithy Gove

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the Tory toves,

And the May’s slough outgrabe.

 

“Beware the Eurobloc, my son!

The jaws that bite, the claws that slay!

Beware the Donald Tusk, and shun

The frumious Barnier!”

 

He took his bafflegab in hand;

Long time the Franc zone foe he sought—

So rested he, blonde tresses free

And stood awhile in thought.

 

And, as in toffish thought he stood,

The Eurobloc, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the Belgian wood,

And burbled as it came!

 

Bah, pish! Piffle whish! Yah boo to you

The bafflegab went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.

 

“And hast thou slain the Eurobloc?

Come to my arms, my British boy!

No Farage day! Corbyn’s dismay!”

He chortled in his joy.

 

’Twas Brexit, and the slithy Gove

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the Tory toves,

And the May’s slough outgrabe.

Strava – Tour de Richmond Park Clockwise

Screenshot 2019-05-22 at 15.24.51

Following my recent update on the Tour de Richmond Park leaderboard, a friend asked about the ideal weather conditions for a reverse lap, clockwise around the park. This is a less popular direction, because it involves turning right at each mini-roundabout, including Cancellara corner, where the great Swiss rouleur crashed in the 2012 London Olympics, costing him a chance of a medal.

An earlier analysis suggested that apart from choosing a warm day and avoiding traffic, the optimal wind direction for a conventional anticlockwise lap was a moderate easterly, offering a tailwind up Sawyers Hill. It does not immediately follow that a westerly wind would be best for a clockwise lap, because trees, buildings and the profile of the course affect the extent to which the wind helps or hinders a rider.

Currently there are over 280,000 clockwise laps recorded by nearly 35,000 riders, compared with more than a million anticlockwise laps by almost 55,000 riders. As before, I downloaded the top 1,000 entries from the leaderboard and then looked up the wind conditions when each time was set on a clockwise lap.

In the previous analysis, I took account of the prevailing wind direction in London. If wind had no impact, we would expect the distribution of wind directions for leaderboard entries to match the average distribution of winds over the year. I defined the wind direction advantage to be the difference between these two distributions and checked if it was statistically significant. These are the results for the clockwise lap.

RoseSegmentBarSegmentclockwise

The wind direction advantage was significant (at p=1.3%). Two directions stand out. A westerly provides a tailwind on the more exposed section of the park between Richmond Gate and Roehampton, which seems to be a help, even though it is largely downhill. A wind blowing from the NNW would be beneficial between Roehampton and Robin Hood Gate, but apparently does not provide much hindrance on the drag from Kingston Gate up to Richmond, perhaps because this section of the park is more sheltered. The prevailing southwesterly wind was generally unfavourable to riders setting PBs on a clockwise lap.

The excellent mywindsock web site provides very good analysis for avid wind dopers. This confirms that the wind was blowing predominantly from the west for the top ten riders on the leaderboard, including the KOM, though the wind strength was generally light.

The interesting thing about this exercise is that it demonstrates a convergence between our online and our offline lives, as increasing volumes of data are uploaded from mobile sensors. A detailed analysis of each section of the million laps riders have recorded for Richmond Park could reveal many subtleties about how the wind flows across the terrain, depending on strength and direction. This could be extended across the country or globally, potentially identifying local areas where funnelling effects might make a wind turbine economically viable.

References

Jupyter notebook for calculations

Can self-driving cars detect cyclists?

Screenshot 2019-05-10 at 14.05.59

Self-driving cars employ sophisticated software to interpret the world around them. How do these systems work? And how good are they at detecting cyclists? Can cyclists feel safe sharing roads with an increasing number of vehicles that make use of these systems?

How hard is it to spot a cyclist?

Vehicles can use a range of detection systems, including cameras, radar and lidar.  Deep learning techniques have become very good at identifying objects in photographic images. So one important question is how hard is it to spot a cyclist in a photo taken from a moving vehicle?

Researchers at Tsinghua University, working in collaboration with Daimler, created a publicly available collection of dashboard camera photos, where humans have painstakingly drawn boxes around other road users. The data set is used by academics to benchmark the performance of their image recognition algorithms. The images are rather grey and murky, reflecting the cloudy and polluted atmosphere of the Chinese city location. It is striking that, in the majority of cases, the cyclists are very small, representing around 900 pixels out of the 2048 x 1024 images, i.e. less than 0.05% of the total area. For example, the cyclist in the middle of the image above is pretty hard to make out, even for a human.

Object-detecting neural networks are typically trained to identify the subject of a photo, which normally takes up are significant portion of the image. Finding a tall, thin segment containing a cyclist is significantly more difficult.

If you think about it, the cyclist taking up the largest percentage of a dash cam image will be riding across the direction of travel, directly in front of the vehicle, at which point it may be too late to take action. So a crucial aspect of any successful algorithm is to find more distant cyclists, before they are too close.

Setting up the problem

Taking advantage of skills acquired on the fast.ai course on deep learning, I decided to have a go at training a neural network to detect cyclists. Many of the images in the Tsinghua Daimler data set include multiple cyclists. In order to make the problem more manageable, I set out to find the single largest cyclist in each image.

If you are not interested in the technical bit, just scroll down to the results.

The technical bit

In order to save space on my drive, I downloaded about a third of the training set. The 3209 images were split 80:20 to create a training and validation sets. I also downloaded 641 unseen images that were excluded from training and used only for testing the final model.

I used transfer learning to fine-tune a neural network using a pre-trained ResNet34 backbone, with a customised head designed to generate four numbers representing the coordinates of a bounding box around the largest object in each image. All images were scaled down to 224 pixel squares, without cropping. Data augmentation added variation to the training images, including small rotations, horizontal flips and adjustments to lighting.

It took a couple of hours to train the network on my MacBook Pro, without needing to resort to a cloud-based GPU, to produce bounding boxes with an average error of just 12 pixels on each coordinate. The network had learned to do a pretty good job at detecting cyclists in the training set.

Results

The key step was to test my neural network on the set of 641 unseen images. The results were impressive: the average error on the bounding box coordinates was just 14 pixels. The network was surprisingly good at detecting cyclists.

oosImages

The 16 photos above were taken at random from the test set. The cyan box shows the predicted position of the largest cyclist in the image, while the white box shows the human annotation. There is a high degree of overlap for eleven cyclists 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15 and 16. Box 9 was close, falling between two similar sized riders, but 7 was a miss. The algorithm failed on the very distant cyclists in 1, 10 and 13. If you rank the photos, based on the size of the cyclist, we can see that the network had a high success rate for all but the smallest of cyclists.

In conclusion, as long as the cyclists were not too far away, it was surprisingly easy to detect riders pretty reliably, using a neural network trained over an afternoon.  With all the resources available to Google, Uber and the big car manufacturers, we can be sure that much more sophisticated systems have been developed. I did not consider, for example, using a sequence of images to detect motion or combining them with data about the motion of the camera vehicle. Nor did I attempt to distinguish cyclists from other road users, such as pedestrians or motorbikes.

After completing this project, I feel reassured that cyclists of the future will be spotted by self-driving cars. The riders in the data set generally did not wear reflective clothing and did not have rear lights. These basic safety measures make cyclists, particularly commuters, more obvious to all road users, whether human or AI.

Car manufacturers could potentially develop significant goodwill and credibility in their commitment to road safety by offering cyclists lightweight and efficient beacons that would make them more obvious to automated driving systems.

References

“A new benchmark for vision-based cyclist detection”, X. Li, F. Flohr, Y. Yang, H. Xiong, M. Braun, S. Pan, K. Li and D. M. Gavrila, in proceedings of IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium (IV), pages 1028-1033, June 2016

Link to Jupyter notebook

Strava: Richmond Park leaderboard update

Screenshot 2019-04-27 at 16.15.55

An extended version of this blog was published by cyclist.co.uk

If you have ever had the feeling that it is becoming harder to rise up the Strava leaderboards and that KOMs are ever more elusive, you are right. I took a snapshot of the top 1000 entries for the Tour de Richmond Park segment in April 2019 and compared it with the leaderboard from February 2017 that I used for an earlier series of blogs.

The current rankings are led by a team of Onyx RT riders, who rode as a group at 6:02am on 25 July 2018, beating Rob Sharland’s solo effort by 6 seconds, with a time of 13:51. Some consider that targeting a KOM by riding as a team time trial is a kind of cheating. Having said that, many riders have achieved their best laps around Richmond Park while riding in the popular Saturday morning and Wednesday evening chain gang rides. In fact, if the Onyx guys had checked my blogs on the optimal wind direction and weather conditions, and chosen a warm evening with a moderate Easterly wind, they would have probably gone faster.

Survival of the fittest

The Darwinian nature of Strava leaderboards ensures that the slowest times are continually culled. Over the two year gap, the average time of the top 1000 riders improved by 35 seconds, which equates to an increase in speed of about 1.6% per annum. In 2017, a time of 17:40 was good enough to reach the top 1000. You now need to complete the rolling 10.8km course in less than 17:07, averaging over 37.8kph, to achieve the same ranking. The rider currently ranked 1000th would have been 503rd on the 2017 leaderboard, making the turnover about 50%.

Speed20172019

Strava inflation produces a right shift in the speeds at which riders complete the segment. Rider speeds exhibit “long tailed” distributions, with just a few riders producing phenomenal performances: although many people can hold an average of 38kph, it remains very hard to complete this segment at over 42kph.

More faster riders

A total of 409 names dropped off the bottom of the 2017 leaderboard, to be replaced by new faster riders. Some of these quicker times were set by cyclists who had improved enough to rise up the leaderboard into the top 1000, while others were new riders who had joined Strava or not previously done a lap of Richmond Park.

Riders riding faster

Of the 591 riders who appeared on both leaderboards, 229 improved their times by an average of 53 seconds. These included about 90 riders who would have dropped out of the top 1000, had they not registered faster times.

Getting faster without doing anything

One curious anomaly arose from the analysis: 32 efforts appearing on the 2019 leaderboard were recorded on dates that should have shown up on the 2017 leaderboard. Nine of these appeared to be old rides uploaded to Strava at a later date, but that left 23 efforts showing faster times in 2019 than 2017 for exactly the same segments completed by the same cyclists on the same rides.

For example, Gavin Ryan’s ride on 25 August 2016 appeared 8th on the 2017 leaderboard with a time of 14:23, but now he appears as 16th on the 2019 leaderboard with a time of 14:20! It seems that Strava has performed some kind of recalculation of historic times, resulting a new “effort_id” being assigned to the same completed segment. If you want to see a list of other riders whose times were recalculated, click here and scroll down to the section entitled “Curious anomaly”.

Summer is the time to go faster

Strava leaderboards were never designed to rank pure solo TT efforts. Although it is possible to filter by sex, age, weight and date, it remains hard to distinguish between team versus solo efforts, road versus TT bikes and weather conditions. The nature of records is that they are there to be broken, so the top times will always get faster. The evidence from this analysis suggests that there are more faster cyclists around today than two years ago.

As the weather warms up, perhaps you can pick a quiet time to move up the leaderboard on your favourite segment, while showing courtesy to other road users and respecting the legal speed limit.

 

 

 

 

Relative Energy Deficit in Sport (RED-S)

EnergyBalance

Unfortunately an increasing proportion of the population of western society has fallen into the habit consuming far more calories than required, resulting an a huge increase in obesity, with all the associated negative health consequences. At the opposite end of the spectrum, a smaller but important group experiences problems stemming from insufficient energy intake. This group includes certain competitive athletes, especially those involved in sports or dance, where a low body weight confers a performance advantage. A new infographic draws attention to this problem and highlights the fact that the individuals have control over the factors that can put them on the path to optimal health and performance.

RED-S

The human body requires a certain amount of energy to perform normal metabolic functions, including, maintaining homeostasis, cardiac and brain activity. The daily requirement is around 2,000 kcal for women and 2,500 kcal for men. Additional energy intake is required to balance the energy requirements any physical activities performed.

Athletes and dancers need to eat more than sedentary people, but they can fall into an energy deficit in two ways.

  • Reducing energy intake, while maintaining the same training load. This is typically an intentional decision, in order to lose weight, in the belief that this might improve performance. It can also arise unintentionally, perhaps due to failing to calculate energy demands of the training programme.
  • Increasing training load, while maintaining the same energy intake. This can often occur unintentionally, as a result of a more intensive training session or a shift into a higher training phase. Some athletes or dancers perform extra training sessions while deliberately failing to eat more, in the hope, once again, that this might improve performance.

While most of the population would benefit from a period of moderate energy deficit. High level athletes and dancers tend to be very lean, to the extent that losing further weight compromises health and performance. The reason is that the endocrine system is forced to react to an energy deficit by scaling back or shutting down key metabolic systems. For example, levels of the sex hormones testosterone and oestrogen can fall, leading to, among other things, reductions in bone density. Unlike men, women have a warning sign, in the form of an interruption or cessation of menstruation. Both men and women with RED-S are likely to suffer from a failure to achieve their peak athletic performance.

Achieving peak performance

Fortunately athletes have control over the levers that lead to peak performance. These are nutrition, training load and, of course, recovery. Consistently fuelling for the energy required, whilst ensuring that the body has adequate time to recover, allows the endocrine system to trigger the genes that lead to the beneficial outcomes of exercise, such as improved cardiovascular efficiency, effective muscular development, optimal body composition, healthy bones and a fully functional immune system. These are the changes required to reach the highest levels of performance.

Screenshot 2019-04-08 at 12.19.45