Pro cycling team networks

The COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed the weakness of the professional cycling business model. The competition between the teams for funding from a limited number of sponsors undermines the stability of the profession. With marketing budgets under strain, more teams are likely to face difficulties, in spite of the great advertising and publicity that the sport provides. Douglas Ryder is fighting an uphill struggle trying to keep his team alive after the withdrawal of NTT as a lead sponsor. One aspect of stability is financial, but another measure is the level of transfers between teams.

The composition of some teams is more stable than others. This is illustrated by analysing the history of riders’ careers, which is available on ProCyclingStats. The following chart is a network of the transfers between teams in the last year, where the yellow nodes are 2020 teams and the purple ones are 2019. The width of the edges indicates how many riders transferred between the teams, with the thick green lines representing the bulk of the riders who stuck with the same team. The blue labels give the initials of the official name of each team, such as M-S (Mitchelton-Scott), MT (Movistar Team), T-S (Trek-Segafredo) and TS (Team Sunweb). Riders who switched teams are labelled in red.

Although there is a Dutch/German grouping on the lower right, the main structure is from the outside towards the centre of the network.

The spikes around the end of the chart show riders like Geoffrey Soupe or Rubén Fernández, who stepped down to smaller non World Tour teams like Team Total Direct Energie (TTDE), Nippo Delko One Provence (NNDP), Euskaltel-Euskadi (E-E), Androni Giocattoli-Sidermec (AG-S ) or U-XPCT (Uno-X Pro Cycling Team).

The two World Tour outliers were Mitchelton-Scott (M-S) and Groupama FDJ (GF), who retained virtually all their riders from 2019. Moving closer in, a group of teams lies around the edge of the central mass, where a few transfers occurred. Moving anti-clockwise we see CCC Team (CT), Astana Pro Team (APT), Trek-Segafredo (T-S), AG2R Le Mondial (ALM), Circus-Wanty Gobert (C-WG), Team Jumbo Visma (TJV), Bora-Hansgrohe (B-H) and EF Pro Cycling (EPC).

Deeper in the mêlée, Ineos (TI_19/IG_20), Deceuninck – Quick Step (D-QS), UAE-Team Emirates (U-TE), Lotto Soudal (LS), Bahrain – McLaren (B-H) and Movistar Team(MT) exchanged a number of riders.

Right in the centre Israel Start-Up Nation (IS-UN) grabbed a whole lot of riders, including 7 from Team Arkéa Samsic (TAS). Meanwhile likes of Victor Campenaerts and Domenico Pozzovivo are probably regretting joining NTT Pro Cycling (TDD_19/NPC_20).

Looking forward

A few of the top riders have contracts for next year showing up on ProCyclingStats. So far 2020/2021 looks like the network below. Many riders are renewing with their existing teams, indicated by the broad green lines. But some big names are changing teams, including Chris Froome, Richie Porte, Laurens De Plus, Sam Oomen, Romain Bardet and Wilco Keldeman, Bob Jungels and Lilian Calmejane.

What about networks of riders?

My original thought when starting this analysis was that over their careers, certain riders must have been team mates with most of the riders in today’s peloton, so who is the most connected? Unfortunately this turned out to be ridiculously complicated, as shown in the image below, where nodes are riders with links if they were ever teammates and the colours represent the current teams. The highest ranked rider in each team is shown in red.

It is hard to make much sense of this, other than to note that those with shorter careers in the same team are near the edge and that Philippe Gilbert is close to the centre. Out of interest, the rider around 9 o’clock linking Bora and Jumbo Visma is Christoph Pfingsten, who moved this year. At least we can conclude that professional cyclists are well-connected.

Author: science4performance

I am passionate about applying the scientific method to improve performance

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